Category Archives: Creative Writing

Partings, New Things

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Partings, New Things

should know by now that summer is a hard time to keep up with a blog. Paradoxically, it’s probably the busiest time of the year for me. But that’s not the only reason that June went by without an update here. A few weeks ago, I lost my grandmother suddenly. It seems like I was just with her, helping her go through her garage and letting go of things that she didn’t need. Last week, I was helping my mother and aunt sort and organize her house, now that she is gone. We never want to say goodbye to anyone in our lives, but there are some ways that we wish we didn’t have to lose them.  Read the rest of this entry

You Can Be More: Writing for Boys

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You Can Be More: Writing for Boys

My last post shared some honest thoughts from Dave Rudden about boys and how they are taught by expectation and example not to feel. I hope that if you’re reading this blog post, you’ve given his excellent essay a read first. I have never been a boy, so my experience with this subject is certainly different, but I hope that my voice can join the discussion in a productive way. It’s an issue that we should all be talking about. Read the rest of this entry

A Poem for November 13, 2015

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A Poem for November 13, 2015

This past week, with the various tragedies that occurred all over the globe, will be remembered with sadness. My heart breaks for the enormous loss of life that so many have witnessed and that so many more will mourn. This time of year is usually when I find poetry more suited for expressing the ideas swirling around in my mind, so I wrote a poem for the day that Paris went dark. My thoughts have been focused on Paris because it is a place where I have walked some of the streets, seen the faces of the people who call it home. I wrote this poem for them, but also for the people in Beirut, and for all of the people who have lost loved ones to tragedy. Read the rest of this entry

A Writer’s Soundtrack

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A Writer’s Soundtrack

One of the hardest things for any person to do is to explain how their mind works. For some, the difficulty is that they simply don’t know. This has its pros and cons. For others, they know exactly and could not, for the life of them, describe it in a coherent way. This too, has its pros and cons. As someone in the latter camp, I can tell you it’s a lot like walking in a garden. You know it’s your garden. You know you planted some things. You even laid some of the footpath yourself. But what comes up, what crawls up over the garden wall, what spreads faster than you can cut it back, what ugly thing finally blooms into loveliness—that you never know. Read the rest of this entry

Victorian Poetry + Beginning a Writing Career = No End to the Philosophy

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Victorian Poetry + Beginning a Writing Career = No End to the Philosophy

Today, I’m writing this post after staggering upright from a wicked backhand rejection email. They say that email messages have no weight, no mass, but I’m convinced that this is a flat-out lie for rejection emails. The quicker they come back to you, the harder it knocks the breath out of you. If you don’t get one for a few months or more, at least most of the momentum has usually died away and you can handle it without too much trouble.  Read the rest of this entry

New Things, Old Things: A Story Set in Kensington Gardens

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New Things, Old Things: A Story Set in Kensington Gardens

I‘ve had a few weeks now where my posts have been more of the nonfiction bent, and while that is all well and good, I do spend most of my writing time telling stories–fictional stories, that is. This week, here’s a short snippet of a new story that I’m working on. I’m writing this one as I begin the sequel for my first novel, Still Dreaming, and since they both deal heavily with books and libraries, it’s proving to be a nice overlap! Meet Sol. He’s the newest addition to my host of characters, and here, he’s out for a walk in Kensington Gardens in London: Read the rest of this entry