Tag Archives: books

Change Changes Us

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Change Changes Us

Maybe it’s just the phase of life I’m in right now, and maybe it’s because a dear friend just recently moved to another state, but change has been on my mind. At first blush, I’m not one to enjoy change, but it’s really not a bad thing. Not when I think about it.

Change changes us. At a crossroads, two people split apart: one that went right and one that went left. If I went right, I can never be the person who went left, and I may never have an inkling of who that person might have become. Read the rest of this entry

Seeing the World Through Stories

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Seeing the World Through Stories

Every person has something that they can’t resist. It catches your eye across a crowded room. You find yourself pulling the nearest person you know along to point it out. Even if you don’t touch it or intend to buy it, you comment on it. For some it’s food, or music, or shoes. For me, it’s books. Read the rest of this entry

You Can Be More: Writing for Boys

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You Can Be More: Writing for Boys

My last post shared some honest thoughts from Dave Rudden about boys and how they are taught by expectation and example not to feel. I hope that if you’re reading this blog post, you’ve given his excellent essay a read first. I have never been a boy, so my experience with this subject is certainly different, but I hope that my voice can join the discussion in a productive way. It’s an issue that we should all be talking about. Read the rest of this entry

Dealing with the Reality of Stories

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Dealing with the Reality of Stories

Think of the last time that you read a book that enveloped you. Time stopped or turned to a dull roar, and even the armrest that you leaned against didn’t seem as real as the people you were reading about. Somewhere in the amazingly intricate pattern of your mind, you could see them as well as a familiar friend’s memory. You could feel their hurt, their wonder, like it was your own.

Think of the last movie that you saw that made you forget that you were sitting in a chair, not only removed but completely safe from any of the action that played out. For a time, you may have even forgotten yourself, following characters into their homes as easily and unnoticed as a sunbeam or a breeze.

There is a magic to storytelling, and part of that magic is its appearance of reality. Read the rest of this entry