Tag Archives: growing up

Change Changes Us

Standard
Change Changes Us

Maybe it’s just the phase of life I’m in right now, and maybe it’s because a dear friend just recently moved to another state, but change has been on my mind. At first blush, I’m not one to enjoy change, but it’s really not a bad thing. Not when I think about it.

Change changes us. At a crossroads, two people split apart: one that went right and one that went left. If I went right, I can never be the person who went left, and I may never have an inkling of who that person might have become. Read the rest of this entry

Seeing the World Through Stories

Standard
Seeing the World Through Stories

Every person has something that they can’t resist. It catches your eye across a crowded room. You find yourself pulling the nearest person you know along to point it out. Even if you don’t touch it or intend to buy it, you comment on it. For some it’s food, or music, or shoes. For me, it’s books. Read the rest of this entry

Learning to Slay Dragons

Standard
Learning to Slay Dragons

One question that virtually every book lover gets asked is the inevitable, “What is your favorite book?” As if it were possible to choose only one book, in the entire universe of books, in all of the galaxies of genre, among all of the stars of narratives. And for those of us who collect books, we know this is a silly question, because why would we need bookshelves if only one book was important to us?

Read the rest of this entry

Why Teenage Boys are Told Not to Feel, and Why That’s So Wrong

Standard
Why Teenage Boys are Told Not to Feel, and Why That’s So Wrong

This week’s post features words from upcoming Irish author Dave Rudden, whose novel Knights of the Borrowed Dark will be released in August of this year. I was delighted and gratified to find his work because not only does the story sound like a really good read, it also resonates with many themes that I think are so vital for children’s literature. One of the most important, particularly for the book that I’m currently querying, is the recognition that boys are raised with an unhealthy and impossible expectation to be stoic and nearly emotionless, told that a man is always strong and does not allow himself weakness of any kind. Read the rest of this entry

Memory: What We Keep and What We Lose

Standard
Memory: What We Keep and What We Lose

Another spring break has come and gone, and it’s gone by in the usual fashion, filled up to the brim with projects and gardening. My mother makes a tradition of going out to see her mother whenever she can break away during spring break, and, having the time, I decided to join her for the drive and visit.

 

Now the spring break trip isn’t for kicking up our feet and catching z’s. In our family, that simply isn’t done! Spring break at Grandma’s house means recovering the garden in the backyard—taming bushes, decimating weeds, severing roots, and other necessities in places where gardens will actually take over if you don’t pay attention to them. I suspect it’s rain that causes this. Read the rest of this entry

In Defense of Growing Up, Part Two

Standard
In Defense of Growing Up, Part Two

I wanted to continue off of my last post, “In Defense of Growing Up,” with a few more thoughts on the subject. Blog posts, they say, need to be short. I’ve learned that it takes me a few hundred pages to fully develop some ideas and discover what I really think—that’s why I am a novelist, after all. And it’s also why I read so much. I know it takes other people a while to fully depict complex and beautiful thoughts, too.

Of course, being a voracious reader has its downsides. Read the rest of this entry

In Defense of Growing Up

Standard
In Defense of Growing Up

From the beginning of our lives, there is one question that hovers over us constantly. When we gaze up into our parents’ eyes, it is there. When we crawl about the floor or dash away to inspect something new, we find it in most of the places we look. When we try something that we have not attempted before and we succeed or fail, it burns in our cheeks with victory or shame. Read the rest of this entry