Tag Archives: novel

You Can Be More: Writing for Boys

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You Can Be More: Writing for Boys

My last post shared some honest thoughts from Dave Rudden about boys and how they are taught by expectation and example not to feel. I hope that if you’re reading this blog post, you’ve given his excellent essay a read first. I have never been a boy, so my experience with this subject is certainly different, but I hope that my voice can join the discussion in a productive way. It’s an issue that we should all be talking about. Read the rest of this entry

Why Teenage Boys are Told Not to Feel, and Why That’s So Wrong

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Why Teenage Boys are Told Not to Feel, and Why That’s So Wrong

This week’s post features words from upcoming Irish author Dave Rudden, whose novel Knights of the Borrowed Dark will be released in August of this year. I was delighted and gratified to find his work because not only does the story sound like a really good read, it also resonates with many themes that I think are so vital for children’s literature. One of the most important, particularly for the book that I’m currently querying, is the recognition that boys are raised with an unhealthy and impossible expectation to be stoic and nearly emotionless, told that a man is always strong and does not allow himself weakness of any kind. Read the rest of this entry

A Character Outside of His Book

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A Character Outside of His Book

The first time I saw him, I wondered if we had met before. I thought the feeling would be easy to shake off, because I knew that I’d never seen this fellow before. Instead, I felt that hesitant sense of discovery, the back-and-forth dance that some of us do when we think we recognize someone a small distance off, but we’re not quite sure. Read the rest of this entry

A Writer’s Soundtrack

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A Writer’s Soundtrack

One of the hardest things for any person to do is to explain how their mind works. For some, the difficulty is that they simply don’t know. This has its pros and cons. For others, they know exactly and could not, for the life of them, describe it in a coherent way. This too, has its pros and cons. As someone in the latter camp, I can tell you it’s a lot like walking in a garden. You know it’s your garden. You know you planted some things. You even laid some of the footpath yourself. But what comes up, what crawls up over the garden wall, what spreads faster than you can cut it back, what ugly thing finally blooms into loveliness—that you never know. Read the rest of this entry